Author Archives: Michael Tyas

About Michael Tyas

Michael Tyas is the managing editor of One River News. He graduated the University of Manitoba with an honours degree in environmental studies, and is a professional videographer and video trainer. He produced the feature length documentary "One River, Many Relations" in Fort Chipewyan. He continues to work with indigenous communities to share their stories around resource extraction, industrial development, and impacts on traditional territories.

Silver Bullet for Oil Sands Growth

The Carbon Bubble, and why it has a bunch of folks worried.
Read More »

The Federal Court of Appeal has upheld that Métis are synonymous to Status Indians under the Canadian Constitution. However, non-status Indians were exempted from the ruling. President of the Metis National Council, Clement Chartier, was “very pleased” Métis have won. Aboriginal Affairs Minister Bernard Valcourt’s people wrote that they were "pleased" that non-status Indians were excluded from the ruling.
Read More »

Kitimat, BC, residents vote against Northern Gateway Pipeline in a non-binding vote.
Read More »

 
Read More »

CBC Softballs News Piece on Sovereignty and Industrial Development, Hits Home Run

Last week, The Current aired a radio segment about Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, who are using Industry money to ensure their own survival and sovereignty. This is the type of airtime any organization dreams of.
Read More »

Baytex ‘Officially’ Stinks [UPDATE]

A report released by the Alberta Energy Regulator concludes what locals in Peace River have said all alongBaytex Officially Stinks. To be fair, Baytex explained last December that, "We are in compliance with all applicable regulations." They must be feeling pretty flared that yesterday's status quo is tomorrow's illegal activity.
Read More »

IMF says Oil Sands No Big Deal, YET!

In an opinion piece released by the IMF, the international moneylender takes a look at the Athabasca Oil Sands and says, "Meh."
Read More »

Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation seems to have mastered the art of biting the hand that feeds them, with the purpose of preserving their environment and culture as industrial development creeps closer.
Read More »
Scroll To Top